Try This— The Easiest Homemade Vegetarian Ramen Recipe

I pretty much lived on ramen when I was in college. Back then my four basic food groups were salt, junk, cheap, and easy. Such is the gut fortitude of a nineteen year old. Times have certainly changed, and though my taste and my junk food cravings haven’t, at least now I’m old enough to try and make healthier choices. I want to keep my ramen classy, y’all. No more undergrad ramen for me! I mix up my own seasoning and keep it on the shelf, ready for those nights when I’m feeling just as sleepy as I did when I was in college. You can’t get much easier than a basic ramen bowl, and with some simple add-ins, you’ll be well on your way to total ramen sophistication. You must try this!!!

Homemade Ramen Seasoning


  • 2 tbsp poultry seasoning
  • 2 tbsp garlic powder
  • 2 tbsp onion powder
  • 2 vegetable bullion cubes
  • 1 tbsp black pepper


  • crush bullion cubes into a powder
  • mix all ingredients, including bullion, together
  • store in an airtight container

Basic Ramen bowl


  • 2 oz vermicelli rice noodles (If you use this kind that’s about one quarter of the box)
  • 1 c of boiling water
  • 1 tbsp homemade ramen seasoning (you might want to start with less and add more to taste)


  • place rice noodles in a small bowl
  • sprinkle with homemade ramen seasoning
  • add boiling water and allow the rice noodles to sit for 3-5 minutes stirring occasionally to separate the noodles
  • Enjoy!

optional add-ins

  • chili oil or (homemade) sriracha, to taste
  • a splash of lemon or lime juice
  • a boiled egg or two
  • lightly fried tofu
  • kimchi
  • quick cooking vegetables: spinach, thinly slice cabbage, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, bean sprouts, or green onions are all good choices
  • frozen vegetables: corn and peas are my favorite! Just be sure to thaw them a bit in warm water before adding them to your ramen bowl

This recipe makes the perfect mason jar lunch. just like these healthy mason jar snack ideas, mason jar ramen is ready in minutes. The dry ingredients have a long shelf life, so you can assemble a few dry noodles/seasoning mason jars well ahead of time. When you’re ready to eat them, just lift one from the pantry and add boiling water. Lunch in 3-5 minutes with no effort! Think of it as a savory alternative to your favorite mason jar oatmeal recipe.

Recipe adapted from: Connoisseurusveg and Minimalist Baker

Try This—5 Vegetarian Recipes That Almost Got Away

I share a lot of recipes with you guys. I know you haven’t tried them all. Don’t be ashamed. I’m not mad. It’s totally ok. We’re still friends and all that and I’m totally here for you if you need a hug. But you do know if I share a recipe twice, I mean business. These are the recipes that may have gotten away from you, but they are so worth it that I had to share them again. Like I always say, you must try this!!!

Halloumi Burgers With Sticky Sriracha Glaze

Tbh, this sriracha glaze is everything. You’ll dream about this sandwich. Promise.

Cheesy Savory Oatmeal

There’s almost nothing as hearty as oatmeal. This stick to your ribs recipe is definitely a keeper.

Pan-Fried Gnocchi

The perfect weeknight dinner. Quick and amazingly tasty, This is sure to become one of your go to meals.

Savory Yogurt Bowls

Who says that yogurt has to be sweet? Not I. These savory yogurt bowls will make you a believer.

Loaded Sweet Potato With Lime Cream

This is probably my favorite way to serve sweet potatoes. I usually fry up some tofu, load up a sweet potato, toss a side salad and pig out like a queen.

Try This— 5 Deliciously, Healthy Ways to Have Dessert for Breakfast

Fun fact for the kids: Marie Antoinette’s famous last words were not ‘Let them eat cake‘, but rather ‘Excuse me, sir, I didn’t mean to do it,” after she accidentally stepped on her executioner’s foot. Taking those two phrases into consideration, I started to wonder whether or not she had cake for breakfast the morning of her decapitation, and if she didn’t she probably should have. This, my friends, is how I rationalize eating dessert for breakfast. The logic is baffling, I know, but my sweet tooth is relentless. I actually have 27 and ½ of them (my wisdom teeth and half of a molar were decidedly opposed to being a part of the team). In order to satisfy my love of all things sweet takes dedication, and at times, illogical justification. I can’t wait until after dinner for dessert, and thanks to these recipes, I don’t have to. Best part? They’re totally healthy, guilt-free sweets that don’t rely on sugar and empty carbs to be totally decadent. You must try this!

Porridge Façon Chunky Monkey

Forget what you may have heard, oatmeal is the breakfast of champions. This stick to your ribs breakfast recipe from Clem Foodie is just, roughly translated, Chunky Monkey Oatmeal. But doesn’t everything sound so much fancier in French?

Chocolate Banana Flax Muffins

These decadent muffins from The Butter Half are a game changer. Flax boasts plenty of fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, while the chocolate and banana add a one-two punch of antioxidants and potassium. Sinfully healthy!

Healthy Mini Cheesecake

With 12 grams of protein per cheesecake, these tasty mini cheesecakes from Hello Glow are the perfect addition to your breakfast routine. They’re sure to keep you fueled up until lunch without weighing you down.

Chocolate Birthday Cake Protein Smoothie

This creamy, chocolatey slice of heaven from The Seasoned Mom is super simple to make and so delicious, you’ll forget it’s actually good for you too. Just blend almond milk, chocolate protein powder, brewed coffee, cocoa powder, and ice together until smooth. Remember that today is always somebody’s birthday somewhere, so it’s always time for a celebratory cake (there goes that logic again).

Yogurt Toppings

As always, I have to add my favorite go-to breakfast staple: yogurt. There are so many satisfyingly sweet toppings that you can add to your breakfast yogurt. For some amazing ideas, check out this definitive list of naughty yogurt toppings!

Try This— Root to Stalk Cooking

I don’t want to look back on my life and think, I could’ve eaten that. Anyone that’s ever tended their own vegetable garden, or paid those hefty price tags for organic vegetables knows the pain of throwing those perfectly green stalks into the compost heap. The amount of care we take and the amount of money we spend to have fresh, organic vegetables in our kitchens is reason enough to adopt the philosophy of root to stalk cooking. The most convincing reason though is that we’ve been robbing ourselves of some pretty vital nutrients and unexpectedly rich flavors without even knowing it. While every home cook knows that vegetable scraps can make the perfect broth, it’s totally easy to overlook the other awesome root to stem cooking techniques. You must try this!

Cauliflower doesn’t have to be cut into florets. Instead, you can slice straight through the stem to create ‘cauliflower steaks’ to roast in the oven or sear in a pan with tomatoes, black olives, and capers

Leeks have those dark green tops that take longer to cook, but transform into a braising green with a slight onion flavor that gives a richness to egg dishes

Beet greens look and taste like a cross between beets and chard (earthy and sharp) and are delicious sautéed and added to a whole-grain salad (think quinoa or cous cous) with pickled beets, goat cheese, and walnuts

Radishes come with peppery-tasting leaves that you can use as salad greens tossed with sweet corn, tomatoes, and a creamy dressing, along with the radishes themselves.

Broccoli stalks used to never make it to my plate. But the silky, dark leaves surrounding broccoli stalks cook like spinach and taste like the sweetest broccoli you’ve ever had. The stalk itself can be peeled leaving the sweet and crunchy part of the stem which is just a perfect addition to a stir fry

Fennel fronds and stems are sweeter than the white bulbs and have a stronger anise flavor. If you like licorice, you can thinly slice the stems and candy them, or head in a savory direction and toss them in a salad with sliced fennel bulbs, shaved Parmesan, lemon juice, and olive oil

These tips and more delicious recipes can be found in Tara Duggan’s Root to Stalk Cooking available on Amazon.

Try This— Vegetarian Lebanese Stew

I’d rather spend half an hour rearranging things in the dishwasher to fit in that last mug than spend the 20 seconds it would take to wash it by hand. Are you sure you want to turn me loose on meal planning? Ok. Let’s go! If my dishwasher ambition tells you anything, it’s that I crave efficiency. I like the idea of making a big meal on a Sunday evening and eating the leftovers throughout the week. Cook once, eat all week. I’ve found that when the weather is as cold as it’s been, there’s nothing more satisfying than a piping hot bowl of stew. Served over rice, mashed potatoes, with a side salad, or as a stand alone meal, vegetarian stews are probably the easiest weeknight meal you can make.

In the past, I’ve always just sliced up root vegetables and dumped them in a slow cooker with some pre-made soup (carrots, turnips, parsnips, onions, potatoes, and yams, with a butternut squash soup base is my favorite). Totally easy way to make a stew, but after a while it can get a little boring. I decided to play with some Middle Eastern flavors in the stew I made last night and I’m so glad I did! Oregano, mint, and cinnamon take this stew to new heights. It’s hearty, stick-to-your-ribs good, yet still seems fresh and lighter than most stews. You must try this!

Lebanese Vegetarian Stew


  • 2 medium onions, diced
  • 1 large bell pepper, chopped. You pick the colors. I like green peppers in this stew
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced.
  • 3 baking potatoes, peeled and chopped.
  • 1 16 ounce can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 16 ounce can of white beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 26.46 ounce box of Pomi Strained Tomatoes or a 28 ounce can of tomato puree
  • 13 ounces or a generous 1-1/2 cups of canned crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup of white wine or a couple of splashes of dry vermouth (optional)
  • 1 1/2 cups of vegetable broth
  • Drizzle of honey or about a teaspoon of sugar to balance the acid in the tomatoes.
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon of dried oregano. Rub it between your fingers to release the flavor.
  • 1/2 teaspoon of dried marjoram (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of dried mint
  • A couple of pinches of ground cinnamon
  • Olive oil for cooking and drizzling
  • Sea salt or kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste


  • In a large dutch oven or an oven safe pot with a lid, saute the onions and bell pepper on medium to medium high heat with some olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Once the pepper and onions are soft, add the potatoes, garlic, chickpeas, white beans, tomatoes, vegetable broth, wine/vermouth, sugar, dried herbs, spices, bay leaves and more salt and pepper.
  • Bring to a gentle boil. Immediately turn down the heat, simmer, covered for about 5-7 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • After 5 minutes of stove top simmering, place the pot in the oven and cook for an additional 30-40 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
  • When the stew is finished cooking, remove bay leaves.
  • Adjust the salt and pepper. Also add a pinch more of dried oregano, mint and cinnamon.
  • Serve with rice or a salad and a dollop of sour cream.
  • Enjoy!

This recipes makes a pretty big pot of stew. If you’re cooking for yourself, you can place the leftovers in mason jars and store for up to a week in the refrigerator, and up to 2 months in the freezer. Bonus: If you’re feeling like you want a pot pie (and really who doesn’t?), this stew makes the perfect filling. Just pour this into your pie pan and bake. Seriously, how easy is that?!

Pro tip: I prefer to use Pomi tomato products because they come in a box instead of a can, and somehow always retain a garden fresh flavor.

recipe adapted from Vintage Kitchen